[KINDLE] ✓ Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America | by ↠ Christina Snyder

Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America By Christina Snyder,

  • Title: Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America
  • Author: Christina Snyder
  • ISBN: 9780674048904
  • Page: 202
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Slavery existed in North America long before the first Africans arrived at Jamestown For centuries, Native Americans took prisoners of war and killed, adopted, or enslaved them This book takes a familiar setting for bondage, the American South, and places Native Americans at the centre of the story.
    Slavery in Indian Country The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America Slavery existed in North America long before the first Africans arrived at Jamestown For centuries Native Americans took prisoners of war and killed adopted or enslaved them This book takes a famil

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    1. In Slavery in Indian Country, Christina Snyder illuminates the complex and dynamic institution of captivity in the early American southeast up to the mid nineteenth century Captivity in this narrative could best be described as an adaptive tradition The practice of captive taking remained consistent throughout the time span of this book, yet it adapted to new needs, conditions, ideas, and pressures Snyder s great accomplishment in this book is accounting for the myriad factors behind these chang [...]

    2. Bit of a misnomer It treats with slavery among the Southern Indians those on the East Coast and as far west as the Mississippi who were south of the territories that the Iroquois controlled Not that meant that the Iroquois were not sometimes a problem It opens with accounts of the Mound Builder chiefdoms vast area controlled by high status religious figures, the chiefs, often claiming to be descendants of the Sun Nutritional deficiencies, particularly those springing from a diet too heavily base [...]

    3. Using captivity customs as a lens through which to explore the history of the southeastern Indian nations, Christina Snyder s 2010 work Slavery in Indian Country engages questions of identity and cross cultural contact Native people doubted that outsiders were fully human, and they certainly did not believe that all people were endowed with natural rights, Snyder tells us Membership in the group was of paramount importance, and native stories of origins typically focus on their own group, not on [...]

    4. This academic work gave me a much greater understanding of tribal conflict that occurred in the American southeast It seems well researched and avoids painting American Indian tribes, white settlers or the free and enslaved blacks with too broad of brush strokes She simply points out trends and similarities and allows the reader to draw his or her own conclusions Her insights into social structures and trends prior to Europeans is balanced and solidly based on archeology I found it interesting h [...]

    5. This book starts off with a dry and academic tone, but once you get into it, it s fascinating It concentrates on life among the southeastern Indian tribes from pre Columbus to about 1850 and traces the changing concept of slavery Pre white folks, you were kin, ally, or enemy, and all enemies were fair game as slaves On the plus side, slavery wasn t hereditary and you could be traded back to your tribe or adopted in your new one But as time went on, slavery in Indian country became pretty much a [...]

    6. The introduction is not very good But, the book is incredible The stories and the facts that she gives and tells us incredibly interesting Slavery certainly changed over the years in the Southern Indian territory Racism raises its ugly head, but the information gleaned from this book is most interesting A great book if you are interested in what happened in the real world between the years of discovery and Manifest Destiny

    7. It was interesting and definitely a part view of Southeastern Native American society that I had not learned about before Although the book is written in a factual and non biased manner, the light it sheds on these Native Americans is not a good one I give the book only three stars because I dislike reading about people being brutally killed and tortured.

    8. This book tied up many loose ends in American history For example, now i know how Andrew Jackson got that way More than any other, this book shows how Native American cultures in the South contributed to everything that happened later on.

    9. The subtitle says everything This book studies southern Indian tribes in the United States and how they changed their traditions about captivity and slavery.

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