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Was Jesus God? By Richard Swinburne,

  • Title: Was Jesus God?
  • Author: Richard Swinburne
  • ISBN: 9780199203116
  • Page: 496
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Writing clearly and powerfully, Swinburne argues that it is probable that the main Christian doctrines about the nature of God and his actions in the world are true In virtue of his omnipotence and perfect goodness, the author shows, God must be a Trinity, live a human life in order to share our suffering, and found a church which would enable him to tell all humans aboutWriting clearly and powerfully, Swinburne argues that it is probable that the main Christian doctrines about the nature of God and his actions in the world are true In virtue of his omnipotence and perfect goodness, the author shows, God must be a Trinity, live a human life in order to share our suffering, and found a church which would enable him to tell all humans about this It is also quite probable that he would provide his human life as atonement for our wrongdoing, teach us how we should live, and tell us his plans for our future after death Among founders of religions, Jesus uniquely satisfies the requirement of living the sort of human life which God would need to have lived But to give us adequate reason to believe that Jesus was God, God would need to put his signature on the life of Jesus by an act which he alone could do raise him from the dead And there is adequate historical evidence that Jesus rose from the dead.
    Was Jesus God Writing clearly and powerfully Swinburne argues that it is probable that the main Christian doctrines about the nature of God and his actions in the world are true In virtue of his omnipotence and pe

    One thought on “Was Jesus God?”

    1. Probably not, but Swinburne is one of the best Christian apologists and this book is a nice overview of his detailed work.

    2. Was Jesus God is a sort of sequel to Richard Swinburne s Is There a God , in which Swinburne, a professor of philosphy at Oxford University, sets out to demonstrate that theism represents a plausible explanation for the origins of the universe In this book, Professor Swinburne takes this conclusion further, and shows that if there is a God, it would be logical for him to behave in the manner attributed to him in the Nicene Creed taking on human form, suffering and being resurrected from the dead [...]

    3. The title of the book may be a bit misleading The book is not primarily focused on arguing for the deity of Christ against, say Arian views of Jesus This book is actually an extension of Swinburne s book Is There a God In that book Swinburne argues for the plausibility of theism In this book Swinburne argues for the plausibility of Christian theism So the book s argument is much broader than the deity of Jesus or the Trinity, though it does include arguments for both of those things Richard Swin [...]

    4. There is only one serious candidate for being God incarnate about whom there is historical evidence if he did these things and not in the least expected if he did not So it is very probable that God became incarnate in Jesus, who led a perfect life, suffered, was crucified, and buried and that he rose from the dead, made atonement for our sins, and founded a Church Page 166 Those sentences sum up most of the arguments covered in this book I think I took too long reading it Some of his arguments [...]

    5. Interesting but ultimately unsatisfactory as apologetics Swinburne argues for the probability and or plausibility of central Christian claims, but faith requires than a probability analysis, and he never takes that additional step Also, his analysis has the air of a math student who has gotten the answers out of the back of the book, and then derives them with the aid of his prior knowledge For those who already believe it offers too much for those who do not believe it offers too little.

    6. It s a book with many great arguments He exemplified his thoughts with good and rational theories However, there are far too many blanket terms that made the reading experience comfortless.

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