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The Narrow Edge: A Tiny Bird, an Ancient Crab, and an Epic Journey By Deborah Cramer,

  • Title: The Narrow Edge: A Tiny Bird, an Ancient Crab, and an Epic Journey
  • Author: Deborah Cramer
  • ISBN: 9780300185195
  • Page: 117
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In a volume as urgent and eloquent as Rachel Carson s Silent Spring, this book winner of the Southern Environmental Law Center s 2016 Reed Environmental Writing Award in the book category reveals how the health and well being of a tiny bird and an ancient crab mirrors our own Winner of the 2016 Rachel Carson Environment Book Award given by the Society of EnvironmentalIn a volume as urgent and eloquent as Rachel Carson s Silent Spring, this book winner of the Southern Environmental Law Center s 2016 Reed Environmental Writing Award in the book category reveals how the health and well being of a tiny bird and an ancient crab mirrors our own Winner of the 2016 Rachel Carson Environment Book Award given by the Society of Environmental Journalists Each year, red knots, sandpipers weighing no than a coffee cup, fly a near miraculous 19,000 miles from the tip of South America to their nesting grounds in the Arctic and back Along the way, they double their weight by gorging on millions of tiny horseshoe crab eggs Horseshoe crabs, ancient animals that come ashore but once a year, are vital to humans, too their blue blood safeguards our health Now, the rufa red knot, newly listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, will likely face extinction in the foreseeable future across its entire range, 40 states and 27 countries The first United States bird listed because global warming imperils its existence, it will not be the last the red knot is the twenty first century s canary in the coal mine Logging thousands of miles following the knots, shivering with the birds out on the snowy tundra, tracking them down in bug infested marshes, Cramer vividly portrays what s at stake for millions of shorebirds and hundreds of millions of people living at the sea edge The Narrow Edge offers an uplifting portrait of the tenacity of tiny birds and of the many people who, on the sea edge we all share, keep knots flying and offer them safe harbor Winner of the 2016 National Academies Communications Award for best book that honors the best in science communications Sponsored by the Keck Futures Initiative a program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, with the support of the W.M Keck Foundation
    The Narrow Edge A Tiny Bird an Ancient Crab and an Epic Journey In a volume as urgent and eloquent as Rachel Carson s Silent Spring this book winner of the Southern Environmental Law Center s Reed Environmental Writing Award in the book category reveals how

    One thought on “The Narrow Edge: A Tiny Bird, an Ancient Crab, and an Epic Journey”

    1. This represents for me a most unusual blend of the very personal and the professional It was a Christmas gift from a co worker with whom we share the use of a reagent made from the blood of horseshoe crabs This material, which I ve been using in my laboratories for 25 years, is required to test pharmaceutical intravenously administered drugs, to assure they are free of tiny amounts of extraneous impurities that could cause fever What I learned recently was the impact that harvesting of horsesho [...]

    2. I both enjoyed and was saddened by this book, which is yet another recital of how natural populations of birds, fish and other wildlife have plunged from plenty to near extinction levels The red knot, a shore bird so not known to most garden birdwatchers is a small bundle of feathers, legs and energy, which travels between the furthest tip of South America and the barren reaches of Arctic Canada in a year Deborah Cramer spent her year travelling on the knot migratory route, meeting the scientist [...]

    3. This was a book which took a long time to read It is complex and very detailed, addressing many issues simultaneously Her writing is at times elegiac and elegant I would like to read of her work.

    4. A very engaging book An excellent case study showing the complexity of an ecological web very well written in layman s terms.

    5. There s a point in most environmental books where I viscerally remember how much humans suck for the rest of the planet God, do we suck I m still mad that we made giant sloths go extinct, and that was 10,000 years ago Anyway, the writing of this book was a bit choppy in parts, but it was a good, well researched conservation story.

    6. A fascinating and compelling exploration of the life and astonishing migration of the red knot, a small shorebird that travels from Tierra del Fuego to the Arctic and back One of the stops on the knots journey is the Delaware Bay, a major horshoe crab breeding ground the crabs eggs provide the red knots with much needed energy to finish their journey Cramer writes vividly and well, and she has visited many of the places the knots travel, making her descriptions come alive with scents and sounds [...]

    7. The author describes the fascinating and incredible journey of red knots as they travel from the tip of South America to and from the arctic primarily in just two hops, with a single stop to refuel on horseshoe crab eggs The author travels the route interviewing and working with researchers attempting to understand the life and physiology of the birds as well as their delicate interconnection with their dwindling supply food as the horseshoe crab population plummets Somewhat repetitions in parts [...]

    8. A fascinating and frightening account of the Red knot s 19,000 mile journey from South America to Arctic nesting grounds Fascinating because the tiny birds have the instinct to navigate the long journey and return annually to the same feeding grounds Frightening because the author documents the many environmental threats that have diminished the knot s numbers drastically The miracle of the food chain is clearly illustrated and it s disruption does not bode well for birds or humans.

    9. This is the first book that I m marking as Did Not Finish I m not proud of that But I just couldn t make it through I tried Knots are cool birds and their natural history and evolution are fascinating If this book had been organized differently, I think it would have been genuinely fun to read The structure just wasn t the kind of non fiction that I can zero in on and sink my teeth into.

    10. A timely, impeccably researched, beautifully written, and necessary book for the time we live in, and the future to come I found myself absorbed not only by this remarkable bird but by the author s journeys and the many characters she encountered along the way.

    11. There was some really good and interesting information in this book, but for some reason, it just didn t flow for me There seemed to be lots of additional information, so it was just a little unfocused at times.

    12. This book retraces the journey of the red knot from South America to the arctic, through several important stops Deborah Cramer shows the different species and places upon which the red knots well being and survival depends But could other species as well depend on the red knots Could it be that we depend upon them Great research and nicely written, I loved this book

    13. The Narrow Edge is The Silent Spring for our time Beautifully written, compelling, profound, filled with despair and hope and resilience.

    14. This book has taken the case of the red knot, a declining species of shorebird, and used it to illustrate the tangled web we unravel when we take a piece out of the highly evolved web of life In this case, humans have been decimating the population of horseshoe crabs, on whose eggs so many shorebirds, including the knot, depend upon for their epic migration from Patagonia to the arctic circle The author narrates her investigation by traveling the length of the flyway, accompanying biologists and [...]

    15. Great book Excellent information and neatly told Some of the chapters in the end got a little redundant and all the names of every ornithologist was a little tedious, but all in all a fascinating look at how we are so much infinitely connected to the natural world around us I actually found the info in the horseshoe crabs the most interesting Who knew we used their blood to make sure IV injections were clean Many people I m sure but not me The history of how ignorant we are is astounding And it [...]

    16. I read this book as part of an assignment for a book club While I did learn a lot, I found I had to keep making notes and going back to re read parts I think much of it has to do with the flow of the writing I had a difficult time staying engaged in the book which is unusual for me I found I actually learned by reading some of the book reviews.Important messages for mankind about global warming and the plight of the red knots sand pipers , which could be applied to other species as well I found [...]

    17. I thought this was terribly depressing, the careless loss of species, world wide, not just here in USA My bookgroup was fortunate to have Deborah Cramer attend, as she lives nearby She sees her book as hopeful, that so many people are dedicated to tracking, counting, advocating for the shore birds and the environment It seems too little too late to me Her adventures in the Arctic were most fascinating to hear, in addition to what was in the book.

    18. A thoroughly researched biology travelogue taking the reader through geography and time along the Eastern seaboard of the Americas, detailing how natural abundance has changed there.

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