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To Win A War: 1918 The Year Of Victory (Cassell Military Classics) By John Terraine,

  • Title: To Win A War: 1918 The Year Of Victory (Cassell Military Classics)
  • Author: John Terraine
  • ISBN: 9780304353217
  • Page: 272
  • Format: Paperback
  • The great disasters of World War I have lingered in men s minds for eight decades, but what precisely happened in the final campaign of 1918 remains a tale virtually untold Yet in those three months that brought the war to a close, devastating battles were fought Here is the full story of the second unknown Battle of the Marne, continuing through the Battle of Amiens, aThe great disasters of World War I have lingered in men s minds for eight decades, but what precisely happened in the final campaign of 1918 remains a tale virtually untold Yet in those three months that brought the war to a close, devastating battles were fought Here is the full story of the second unknown Battle of the Marne, continuing through the Battle of Amiens, and the breaking of the Hindenburg Line.
    To Win A War The Year Of Victory Cassell Military Classics The great disasters of World War I have lingered in men s minds for eight decades but what precisely happened in the final campaign of remains a tale virtually untold Yet in those three months t

    One thought on “To Win A War: 1918 The Year Of Victory (Cassell Military Classics)”

    1. A decent look at the last six months of the Great War, bar 50 odd pages of introduction that hurry forward from New Year 1918 The focus is squarely on the Western Front, with the Bulgarian Turkish collapses wrapped up in singular background sentences Terraine is a good writer who employs lengthy ad verbatim reproductions of correspondence and conversation to breathe life into such matters as the abdication of the Kaiser or the composition and deliverance of the Armistice terms In lesser hands, t [...]

    2. Terraine wants to recover the story of the great Allied especially British victories in 1918, which he feels have been unfairly overshadowed by the great follies and horrors both before and after After all, it was the greatest series of victories in British history in terms of number of troops defeated, prisoners taken, and guns captured But his workmanlike narrative history doesn t really sell the story in my book The Allies noted that the German will to resist was starting to crumble in a few [...]

    3. John Terraine is the giant on whose shoulders most modern Great War historians are standing and this is a great book 1918 is ludicrously under explored in print though the centenary is, at last, doing something to redress this Terraine was writing at a time when Haig was seen as the blundering butcher of Oh What a Lovely War rather than the far complex figure of a soldier doing his job winning the war This book did a good job of presenting the reality rather than the myth.

    4. A wonderfully erudite look at a little known aspect of the great war How it was won and how the much maligned British Army did that almost alone.

    5. It remains a classic account of the war s final year, and has much to say about the circumstances that caused the Spring Offensive to fail and the Hundred Days Offensive to succeed.

    6. Very well researched book which dispels the myth that the first world war generals were stupid and unimaginative In 1918 Haig achieved that Eisenhower Montgomery did in 44 45.

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