[EPUB] ↠ Madame Bovary's Ovaries: A Darwinian Look at Literature | By ✓ David Philip Barash Nanelle R. Barash

Madame Bovary's Ovaries: A Darwinian Look at Literature By David Philip Barash Nanelle R. Barash,

  • Title: Madame Bovary's Ovaries: A Darwinian Look at Literature
  • Author: David Philip Barash Nanelle R. Barash
  • ISBN: 9780385338028
  • Page: 301
  • Format: Paperback
  • What can elephant seals tell us about Homer s Iliad How do gorillas illuminate the works of Shakespeare What do bloodsucking bats have to do with John Steinbeck Madame Bovary s OvariesA Darwinian Look at Literature According to evolutionary psychologist David Barash and his daughter Nanelle, the answers lie in the most important word in biology evolution Just like eveWhat can elephant seals tell us about Homer s Iliad How do gorillas illuminate the works of Shakespeare What do bloodsucking bats have to do with John Steinbeck Madame Bovary s OvariesA Darwinian Look at Literature According to evolutionary psychologist David Barash and his daughter Nanelle, the answers lie in the most important word in biology evolution Just like every animal from mites to monkeys, our day to day behavior has been shaped by millions of years of natural selection So it should be no surprise to learn that the natural forces that drive animals in general and Homo sapiens in particular are clearly visible in the creatures of literature, from Henry Fielding s Tom Jones all the way to Helen Fielding s Bridget Jones Seen through the lens of evolutionary biology, the witty repartee of Jane Austen s courting couples, Othello s tragic rage, the griping of Holden Caulfield, and the scandalous indiscretions of Madame Bovary herself all make a fresh and exciting kind of sense The ways we fall in and out of love, stand by our friends, compete against our enemies, and squabble with our families have their roots in biological imperatives we share not only with other primates but with an amazing array of other creatures The result is a new way to read, a novel approach to novels and plays that reveals how human nature underlies literature, from the great to the not so great.Using the cutting edge ideas of contemporary Darwinism, the authors show how the heroes and heroines of our favorite stories have been molded as much by evolution as by the genius of their creators, revealing a gallery of characters from Agamemnon to Alexander Portnoy, who have in common with birds, fish, and other mammals than we could ever have imagined.As engaging and informative as a good story, Madame Bovary s Ovaries is both an accessible introduction to a fascinating area of science and a provocatively sideways look at our cherished literary heritage Most of all, it shows in a delightfully enteraining way how science and literature shed light on each other.
    Madame Bovary s Ovaries A Darwinian Look at Literature What can elephant seals tell us about Homer s Iliad How do gorillas illuminate the works of Shakespeare What do bloodsucking bats have to do with John Steinbeck Madame Bovary s OvariesA Darwinian Look

    One thought on “Madame Bovary's Ovaries: A Darwinian Look at Literature”

    1. You gotta have a gimmick Gypsy Reader, beware With all the sweaty desperation of a couple of cheap strippers, here comes the distinctly unsavory father and daughter vaudeville team of David P and Nanelle R Barash, bumping and grinding towards you, tipping you a leering wink as they try to lure you with their patented gimmick the special high tech e vo lution ary reading lens.Gentle reader, run for your life It s not just that this pair of brachiate mouth breathers have nothing of interest to imp [...]

    2. Depending on how you look at it, Madame Bovary s Ovaries is either a bit of a pop science lark or one of the stupidest books written in a long time If you read it as a breezy application of current ideas in sociobiology and evolutionary science to the field of literature, it makes for an occasionally interesting primer It analyses our selfish genes in action, using the classics as data Exploring themes ranging from adultery to kin selection to parent offspring conflict, it draws on the examples [...]

    3. If you are one of those people who have wondered what evolution and literature have in common then this is a must read If you are like me and just like reading about literature and enjoy other peoples observations and theories then I recommend this book to you also David Barash and Nanelle Barash take some of the most popular literature and explain why these books are still favorites due to their basics themes, which are all evolutionary concepts A fascinating look at Othello, Holden Caulfield, [...]

    4. This started off well, I enjoyed the first couple of chapters which were quite insightful but after a while it became a bit slow, I would recommend it to English students as it is an interesting perspective on the evolution of literature.

    5. A cogent and accessible summary of genetic and Darwinian theory to date, illustrated from the lives of literary characters I fell off the sled towards the end, but if I were less familiar with the material I possibly would have been gripped.

    6. Certainly not a book for everybody The authors are evolutionary biologists in their approach to literary criticism, and they do an uneven job of presenting their thesis in my opinion , although it is interesting and intriguing and undoubtedly correct One reason we love great tales is that the characters come across to us as real, and this means that the authors had a gift for seizing what is uniquely human in us and an ability to create tales where the actions of the characters is authentic and [...]

    7. With such an awesome title and chapter headings e.g How to Make Rhett Give a Damn, Wisdom from the Godfather I expected a lot from this book, some real biology and an interesting look at literary works It didn t quite live up to expectation Chapter 1 The Human Nature of Stories A Quick Hit of Bio Lit Crit, gave the most information in why a biological perspective in reviewing literature is valuable and important, why certain stories endure the Classics and certain characters seem most believable [...]

    8. I have never read so much bad science, bad literary theory and banalities in one volume before Madame Bovary s Ovaries is populist writing at its worst misleading, vulgar and insulting to the intelligence of a hedgehog.The book is a collection of random quotations glued together with such illuminating gems as these And that writes about it the evidence is now undeniable that much of human life is not socially constructed.The play is great because it is wonderfully written .True it is that by sac [...]

    9. Noam Chomsky once said It is quite possible overwhelmingly probable, one might guess that we will always learn about human life and human personality from novels than from scientific psychology I think this insight speaks to something very important about the humanities and what they can reveal to us about the human experience Literary theory and some forms of literary criticism , however, can come across as obscure, esoteric, and confusing as hell Fear not, the ideas from Charles Darwin can he [...]

    10. Thoroughly silly in a good way academic look at the way that biology and particularly evolution can be seen in literature Some of the points became a bit repetitive, i.e and this is how this theory is shown in Anna Karenina and this is how it s shown in Kafka s work Ended up sounding a bit like ooh, these are the books that i read Still, very entertaining, even so when at the end I realized that it was written by a father and young daughter o Anyone who s taken an anthropology or biology class [...]

    11. The concept of this book was very entertaining, but after several chapters, it seemed repetitive and rather simplistic Most people who have taken English and biology in high school, or introductory courses on those subjects in university can probably put the two together.While using literature to exemplify evolutionary human behaviour is novel, it is not exactly an eureka moment of discovery Literary works, whether they feature humans or animals most anthropomorphized ones , often serve as socia [...]

    12. Entertaining, but with major holes in the logic The scientific conclusions are sometimes merely conjectured I felt as if they started their research in the middle of the book , so to speak Pop science by concensus.ough some of it seemed dead on which is probably why they felt at liberty to fill in the holes with supposition Truth mixed with fiction is the oldest hook in the book.

    13. My professors had us use this book in class to interpret another novel through the concepts given in the book It was easy to read and I loved all of the biological reasons behind what has been written and what continues to be written It is easy to find all of ideas offered in this book in other literature after having been exposed Overall, this book was a great reference I would recommend it to everyone.

    14. As a psychoanalyst, I am very interested in evolutionism In my mind it goes together since society is made up of rules that restrain our animal impulses.So whenever you want to understand a human motive, look for animal behaviour.This book is both very enlightening and humorous Through classics of literature, it reveals the strive for survival that the characters adopt.Great book, nice and light prose.

    15. Finally I got my hands on a copy and I got a chance to read it before school This is a fantastic non fiction book It s a strange combination, science and literature, but the author makes it all come together There were many things in this book that I had never heard before, I thought the information about how fat in hips and breasts are an evolutionary fake out made perfect common sense, I had just never heard read it before Very interesting book overall.

    16. Madame Bovary s Ovaries is a fascinating book a look at literature, from the earliest to the modern through the medium of evolutionary biology It is at once a n explanation why we do what we do as well as a look at why some literary works fascinate us as they do Do not miss this one Even if you are not a fan of serious reading, you ll enjoy this book.

    17. Interesting I think purely because of my love of biology definitely falls under the category of over analysis Strays away from the literature too much to call itself a darwinian look at literature, i think like basic evolutionary theory with occasional references to famous novels meh it was okay.

    18. How could I not love a book that married evolutionary biology with great literature The father daughter team of authors use examples from books like Pride and Prejudice and Madame Bovary to explain the biological roots of human behavior My only complaint, and therefore the withholding of that final star, is that the explanations end up being too simplistic.

    19. I read this book as a requirement for a LIT class I took Darwin and Literature I compares Darwin s core theories to human behavior I found it very interesting and easy to read It is a way and perspective of looking at things that I would have never thought of otherwise If you are interested in Darwin and natural science you might enjoy this book I did.

    20. Interesting I think purely because of my love of biology definitely falls under the category of over analysis Strays away from the literature too much to call itself a darwinian look at literature, i think like basic evolutionary theory with occasional references to famous novels meh it was okay.

    21. Recommended by my friend Beth, who has a wicked sense of humor She nominated this one as a book club book, but it wasn t chosen I thought it would have been a great one to discuss But I still haven t read it.

    22. I loved it How could I not It has two of my very favorite things Literature and Evolutionary Biology Sure it s a bit of a Pop Science book, but its wildly smart and funny In particular, the chapter titles made my day.

    23. They lost me by chapter two chants apology that goes along with not finishing a book Yes, David I gave up Sorry It s a great idea but the follow through just didn t work for me my friend who has NEVER put a book away without finishing it.

    24. LOVED the title and thesisthe content and language, NOT so muchit s a bit racy and sensationalized, which would be admittedly hard not to do given the topic, but i gave up a few chapters in there s no need to drop the f bomb in a nonfiction lit crit book, in my opinion.

    25. A great book, written by father and daughter to explain human nature, through the books in which have reached us through the years Male pattern aggression is explained through shakespeare What women want is want is explained through Austin Fun for any lover of classic works.

    26. Read my review ofMadame Bovary s Ovaries I loaned this book to a colleague and never got it back NEVER lend your books to anyone

    27. I love the practical application of the focus on the biological evolutionary drives of human interactions and behaviors as a way to examine characters in literary works Enlightening

    28. I love LitI love AnthroI did not so much love this book.I s short, and a quick read, but I wouldn t read it again unless I had to for school.

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