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Birds in a Cage By Derek Niemann,

  • Title: Birds in a Cage
  • Author: Derek Niemann
  • ISBN: 9781780720937
  • Page: 301
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Soon after his arrival at Warburg PoW camp, British army officer John Buxton found an unexpected means of escape from the horrors of internment Passing his days covertly watching birds, he was unaware that he, too, was being watched Peter Conder, also a passionate ornithologist, had noticed Buxton gazing skywards He approached him and, with two other prisoners, they fouSoon after his arrival at Warburg PoW camp, British army officer John Buxton found an unexpected means of escape from the horrors of internment Passing his days covertly watching birds, he was unaware that he, too, was being watched Peter Conder, also a passionate ornithologist, had noticed Buxton gazing skywards He approached him and, with two other prisoners, they founded a secret birdwatching society.This is the untold story of an obsessive quest behind barbed wire Through their shared love of birds, the four PoWs overcame hunger, hardship, fear and stultifying boredom Their quest would draw in not only their fellow prisoners, but also some of the German guards, at great risk to them all.Derek Niemann draws on original diaries, letters and drawings, to show how Conder, Barrett, Waterston and Buxton were forged by their wartime experience into the giants of postwar wildlife conservation Their legacy lives on.
    Birds in a Cage Soon after his arrival at Warburg PoW camp British army officer John Buxton found an unexpected means of escape from the horrors of internment Passing his days covertly watching birds he was unaware

    One thought on “Birds in a Cage”

    1. I liked this book.Birds in a Cage is the story of four British prisoners of war, Second Lieutenant Peter Conder, Second Lieutenant John Buxton, Second Lieutenant George Waterston and Squadron Leader John Barrett, who, after WWII, went on to influence nature conservation practice and policy.It s a remarkable tale which is beautifully told On the face of it, it might not sound like the most interesting of subjects, but it really is fascinating.Reading this book made me think of how easy birders ha [...]

    2. Imagine day to day life as a World War Two prisoner of war POW and bird watching wouldn t probably be the first activity that springs to mind Yet, Derek Niemann s book, Birds in a Cage , is about just that and much .Four British POWs John Buxton, Peter Conder, John Barrett and George Waterston find purpose and solidarity as ornithologists, observing birds when and where possible during their imprisonment in Germany and Poland In spite of their situation as long term POWs, the constant fear that [...]

    3. Birds in a Cage tells the story of four keen birdwatchers Peter Conder, John Buxton, George Waterston and John Barrett who met in a German prisoner of war camp and spend their days undertaking scientific research on bird migrations and behaviour Post war the four men each became part of Britain s wildlife conservation movement, maintaining professional and personal relationships for the rest of their lives As is often the case with popular history books the subtitle is somewhat misleading Four s [...]

    4. An extraordinary, moving account of the experiences of WWII four prisoners of war, united by their interest in the wild birds that nested and flew freely around the barbed wire enclosed camps Their meticulous observations and study of the birds helped them cope with the degradations and privations of their imprisonment and, in many ways, helped shaped their futures when they were finally repatriated An engrossing and inspiring read, it moved me to tears in at least three places, so horrific were [...]

    5. P.158 extract from an article by George Raeburn which appeared in The Magazine in 1943 Pseudo Nightingales The observer will soon find that many normal brother officers hear nightingales singing at night when he does not This admission will involve him in a grave loss of prestige and it is of little avail to talk glibly about the possibility of reed warblers or owls being the true source of the midnight music, as his own infallibility on the subject of nightingales is the honest belief and proud [...]

    6. On my To Be Borrowed list for some time, this book killed two birds with one stone sorry 30DaysWild and Title beginning with B for my library book caf.It wasn t quite the story I was expecting Perhaps I thought it would be saccharine that these men, all PoWs of the Germans for years on end were saved by their detailed observations of birdlife in the camps and science enriched Well, perhaps they were but it was a close run thing then, and after Derek Niemann has concentrated it seems on accuracy [...]

    7. To fully appreciate this book you should ideally have an interest in ornithology which I do , because the men in this moving story of surviving internment as PoWs during the second world war are obsessive birders They spend their every waking hour compiling lists and recording the behaviour of each and every species that flits over the barbed wire or lands in the camp This is how a select few prisoners survive hardship, hunger and boredom over five long years It makes fascinating reading for any [...]

    8. I was disappointed with this book I understood the novel would be about the 4 main characters and their thoughts, feelings and lives, instead it really was a long list of bird sightings etc So if you are into ornithology then this may be a very interesting read, if however you have no knowledge or interest in this subject then this book is definitely one to give a miss

    9. WW II story about British officers in POW camps The soldiers use bird watching to maintain their sanity and vicariously enjoy freedom They continue to develop their love of naturalism after the camps by working in various fields related to ornithology Written in association with the Royal Society for the Preservation of Birds.

    10. One of the unusual books on the history of birding, this is the true story of four British serviceman who were POWs in World War II, and found purpose and camaraderie in their love of birds I found the presentation a bit dry, but overall it s a great example of how immersion in the natural world can help people get through almost any circumstance.

    11. have to admit i did glaze over a bit during some of the birdtwitching sections but otherwise this was a really interesting book A completely different insight into life in the POW camps and how a few found a wonderfully positive way to cope.

    12. The premise was intriguing but the author did not bring in enough war stories to make it compelling for me.

    13. It takes months to finish this book But it was amazing Especially the poet Beautiful story, smooth line, and strong characters.

    14. A completely different look at prisoners of war and revealing insight into how a serious hobby can help in desperate situations I am glad I read this book.

    15. The way this book was written portrayed the effects the war took away from these men and yet showed how we adapt to all circumstances.I am not a twitcher in anyway but enjoyed this book.

    16. This was a wonderful insight into a little story within a large war A glimpse at the way a handful of men found a way to cope with something few of us can begin to imagine A reminder of the gifts that the natural world can give us if we give it a chance At times the telling felt a little flat, but perhaps that is somewhat inevitable when trying to build up a picture from fragments of records as opposed to first hand experience.

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