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Cavemen, Monks, and Slow Food: A History of Eating Well By Devra Gartenstein,

  • Title: Cavemen, Monks, and Slow Food: A History of Eating Well
  • Author: Devra Gartenstein
  • ISBN: 9780615437279
  • Page: 149
  • Format: Paperback
  • During the Middle Ages, when sugar was rare and expensive, rotten teeth were a status symbol Today, sugar is so cheap that food manufacturers use it for filler, and we rhapsodize about the fresh, local ingredients that medieval peasants grew in their kitchen gardens Cavemen, Monks, and Slow Food A History of Eating Well tells the fascinating story of our relationship wiDuring the Middle Ages, when sugar was rare and expensive, rotten teeth were a status symbol Today, sugar is so cheap that food manufacturers use it for filler, and we rhapsodize about the fresh, local ingredients that medieval peasants grew in their kitchen gardens Cavemen, Monks, and Slow Food A History of Eating Well tells the fascinating story of our relationship with our meals, from the Paleolithic hunters who painted their prey on remote cave walls, to the medieval monks who fashioned fine cheeses and liqueurs, to the artisans and organic farmers who supply today s trendy restaurants.This book tells the riveting tale of our perpetually unfolding relationship with food, while offering needed perspectives on urgent modern concerns.
    Cavemen Monks and Slow Food A History of Eating Well During the Middle Ages when sugar was rare and expensive rotten teeth were a status symbol Today sugar is so cheap that food manufacturers use it for filler and we rhapsodize about the fresh loca

    One thought on “Cavemen, Monks, and Slow Food: A History of Eating Well”

    1. This book has a lot of history about the Food Industry and is really such an easy read everyone should check it out I found the first half less interesting, which covered the Pre Neolithic to the Middle Ages, but I have also studied this period so it may have just seemed repetitive If you have already a really well rounded knowledge of the history of Food, it may not be for you Once Gartenstein gets into the Industrial Revolution things really become interesting, I learned about the origins of m [...]

    2. I really enjoyed this til about two thirds through and then it became a bit too preachy and scientific I understand the issues, but practical considerations modern lifestyles and sheer numbers of human mouths to feed need to be catered for as well

    3. A brief look at food through history Writing is clear The author has a bias toward plant based food diet, but doesn t preach about it as some do If you know nothing about food history, this is a fine book but if you are familiar with food and all forms of history about it then this is not the book for you.

    4. I received a copy of this book through Aside from presenting a history of human eating habits, Gartenstein opens the reader s eyes to the substandard conditions that surround all aspects of what we eat today and compares it to the simple, organic foods our ancestors enjoyed She also provides knowledge and information the reader may find useful in altering their own diet to benefit themselves, the people working hard to produce their food, and the environment While it doesn t seem to be a deliber [...]

    5. This was an amazing book Recently I got into cooking and over the summer I experimented Htis book was amazing in that it told me things about the food I use everyday, their origins and other little tidbits that I did not know before Like the whole thing with balck teeth and how it was a status symbol back then, the blacker your teeth were, the richer you were It was easy to read, clear bold print and the little stories told in a narrative style was enjoyable to read Written by a woman who knows [...]

    6. There are plenty of books out there that tell us what to eat, but this is a rare find that explores WHY we like what we do From the earliest hunter gatherers to the surprisingly less healthy farmers, to the gluttony of the early American expansion, Gartenstein looks at quantity and quality, and points the way for us to understand the context of our own relationships with food.

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