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Seahenge: a quest for life and death in Bronze Age Britain By Francis Pryor, Seahenge a quest for life and death in Bronze Age Britain May , We only have fragments of the past, some larger than others Seahenge being one of the latter, far ahead of potsherds but perhaps mysterious and while archaeology has some light to shed, I find it best to accept up front that no one can offer Seahenge a quest for life and death in Bronze Age Britain Jun , Seahenge a quest for life and death in Bronze Age Britain Francis Pryor on FREE shipping on qualifying offers A lively and authoritative investigation into the lives of our ancestors, based on the revolution in the field of Bronze Age archaeology which has been taking place in Norfolk and the Fenlands over the last twenty years Seahenge a quest for life and death in Bronze Age Britain A lively and authoritative investigation into the lives of our ancestors, based on the revolution in the field of Bronze Age archaeology which has been taking place in Norfolk and the Fenlands over the last twenty years, and in which the author has played a central role.One of the most haunting and enigmatic archaeological discoveries of recent Seahenge a quest for life and death in Bronze Age Britain Oct , Seahenge a quest for life and death in Bronze Age Britain by Francis Pryor We d love you to buy this book, and hope you find this page convenient in locating a place of purchase. Seahenge a quest for life and death in Bronze Age Britain Jun , Seahenge a quest for life and death in Bronze Age Britain by Francis Pryor Thanks for Sharing You submitted the following rating and review We ll publish them on our site once we ve reviewed them. Seahenge a quest for life and death in Bronze Age Britain Seahenge demonstrates how much Western civilisation owes to the prehistoric societies that existed in Europe in the last four millennia BC Preview this book What people are saying

  • Title: Seahenge: a quest for life and death in Bronze Age Britain
  • Author: Francis Pryor
  • ISBN: 9780007101924
  • Page: 189
  • Format: Paperback
  • A lively and authoritative investigation into the lives of our ancestors, based on the revolution in the field of Bronze Age archaeology which has been taking place in Norfolk and the Fenlands over the last twenty years, and in which the author has played a central role.One of the most haunting and enigmatic archaeological discoveries of recent times was the uncovering inA lively and authoritative investigation into the lives of our ancestors, based on the revolution in the field of Bronze Age archaeology which has been taking place in Norfolk and the Fenlands over the last twenty years, and in which the author has played a central role.One of the most haunting and enigmatic archaeological discoveries of recent times was the uncovering in 1998 at low tide of the so called Seahenge off the north coast of Norfolk This circle of wooden planks set vertically in the sand, with a large inverted tree trunk in the middle, likened to a ghostly hand reaching up from the underworld , has now been dated back to around 2020 BC The timbers are currently and controversially in the author s safekeeping at Flag Fen.Francis Pryor and his wife an expert in ancient wood working and analysis have been at the centre of Bronze Age fieldwork for nearly 30 years, piecing together the way of life of Bronze Age people, their settlement of the landscape, their religion and rituals The famous wetland sites of the East Anglian Fens have preserved ten times the information of their dryland counterparts like Stonehenge and Avebury, in the form of pollen, leaves, wood, hair, skin and fibre found pickled in mud and peat.Seahenge demonstrates how much Western civilisation owes to the prehistoric societies that existed in Europe in the last four millennia BC.
    Seahenge a quest for life and death in Bronze Age Britain A lively and authoritative investigation into the lives of our ancestors based on the revolution in the field of Bronze Age archaeology which has been taking place in Norfolk and the Fenlands over th

    One thought on “Seahenge: a quest for life and death in Bronze Age Britain”

    1. Archaeology is not some exact science, with answers to give to every question if we only look hard enough It s partly our own fault we re overpopulating the Earth, and in the meantime we re destroying great swathes of the archaeological record We only have fragments of the past, some larger than others Seahenge being one of the latter, far ahead of potsherds but perhaps mysterious and while archaeology has some light to shed, I find it best to accept up front that no one can offer a complete an [...]

    2. What an interesting view of archeological discovery and enterprise in the bronze age One thing that I really took home with this book was the differences in time period of the neolithic throughout the old world in different locations As soon as I determined the time period in Britain I found myself asking if this was the same time period throughout Mesopotamia and other areas of the world and made a sound correlation between Britain and other locations at this time period in terms of development [...]

    3. Loved reading this little tome It was like having a conversation with Francis Pryor about things I care about quite passionately His open and honest approach to archaeology and prehistory means that he can consider out of the box ideas, which means that he can pose some interesting and very thought poking analysis that makes much sense to me than the traditional historical analysis that I learned in school I remember the first time I went to a prehistory site, with my history teacher in grammar [...]

    4. Really interesting in parts, but I found the title and description on the back somewhat deceptive there s a brief prologue about Seahenge, and then Pryor goes back in time to give background on his work in the surrounding area and doesn t get back to talking about Seahenge itself until the last 100 or so pages There s some good stuff throughout the other 200 pages descriptions of the excavation process in the fens, how Pryor thinks the henges in this area were used, what everyday life might have [...]

    5. Now I m going to read a different archaeologist on Stonehenge My quest to understand a society without written language continues.

    6. Not an easy read because of lots of details that need grounding in accessible charts and maps Still, a fascinating read on British paleoarchaeology, including te famous henges

    7. Pryor is a highly entertaining writer, equally adept at telling pub tales of his discoveries and creating a deep context for them within contemporary archaeology and within an image of Neolithic Britain The only small downside to Pryor s breezy style is his willingness to digress into tangential opinions, some a bit distasteful But overall this firsthand account of one of the most interesting recent discoveries in British archaeology is absolutely fascinating, both for its process and for its ad [...]

    8. I thought I d just cherry pick a chapter of this because it was about a neolithic archeology dig and I am doing research for my novel But as I got to reading, the author was imparting so much information that one bread crumb lead to the next and I just couldn t put it down I actually gave up on flagging pages and just got out my notebook and started taking notes There is a wealth of information here, including the inner workings of a career in archeology and what you might expect on a dig, but a [...]

    9. This book was my introduction to prehistory and I actually couldn t put it down not until my eyelids shut of their own accord about three in the morning, anyway It was easy to understand but gave a satisfying and fascinating wealth of detail And it was so exciting when I interpreted the clues the same as Pryor did I am now hooked on prehistory and especially henges So thank you Francis Pryor

    10. This book was really incredible Pryor is a great writer, he manages to tell a fascinating story with enough explanation of archaeology so that you fully understand why certain conclusions are reached, but he is never over technical, and he also does not talk down to the reader Reading this book is not at all like listening to a stuffy lecture, he s like those rare teachers who can hold an audience enthralled, who teach from experience and by storytelling instead of from the textbook.

    11. Very interesting themes and a moving ending My copy is the 2002 version and i would like to read the later version to see if it includes Blick Mead and whether his musings about the Avenue at Stonhenge are updated

    12. For a non fiction book by an archeologist, this book was amazingly readable I do admit that towards the end my attention was easily diverted, but stay with it I did For anyone who thinks Stonehenge is a unique place, it is so amazing to read about so many Neolithic sites in Great Britain.

    13. A fascinating and very accessible account of Bronze Age ritual sites, and how boggy areas and wetlands fit into the landscape of prehistoric Great Britain.

    14. A bit dry for the general population, but would recommend for those with an interest in the neolithic and British pre history, or those with some background in archaeology.

    15. This was one of the most enjoyable books I ve had to read The mix of archaeological thinking and lovely anecdotes about life in the trenches was a wonderful journey.

    16. The first book I read by Pryor, back when I first started doing research on henges.Also an excellent read.

    17. This book rekindled my interest in archaeology It s about the thrill of discovery and also a great introduction to archaeology.

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