[KINDLE] ✓ Free Read ñ The Great Escape: Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World : by Kati Marton À

The Great Escape: Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World By Kati Marton,

  • Title: The Great Escape: Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World
  • Author: Kati Marton
  • ISBN: 9780743261159
  • Page: 371
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In this ground breaking book, acclaimed author Kati Marton brings to life an unknown chapter of World War II the tale of nine men who grew up in Budapest s brief Golden Age, then, driven from Hungary by anti Semitism, fled to the West, especially to the United States, and changed the world These nine men, each celebrated for individual achievements, were actually part ofIn this ground breaking book, acclaimed author Kati Marton brings to life an unknown chapter of World War II the tale of nine men who grew up in Budapest s brief Golden Age, then, driven from Hungary by anti Semitism, fled to the West, especially to the United States, and changed the world These nine men, each celebrated for individual achievements, were actually part of a unique group who grew up in a time and place that will never come again It is Marton s extraordinary achievement to trace what for a few dazzling years was common to all of them the magic air of Budapest and show how their separate lives and careers were, in fact, all shaped by Budapest s lively cafe life before the darkness closed in Marton follows the astonishing lives of four history changing scientists, all just one step ahead of Hitler s terror state, who helped usher in the nuclear age and the computer Edward Teller, John von Neumann, Leo Szilard, and Eugene Wigner two major movie myth makers Michael Curtiz, who directed Casablanca, and Alexander Korda, who produced The Third Man two immortal photographers Robert Capa and Andre Kertesz and one seminal writer Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon.Marton follows these brilliant products of Budapest s Golden Age as they flee fascism in the 1920s and 1930s en route to sanctuary and immortality As the scientists labor in the secret city of Los Alamos in the race to build the atom bomb, Koestler, once a communist agent imprisoned by Franco, writes the most important anticommunist novel of the century Capa, the first photographer to go ashore on D Day, later romances Ingrid Bergman and is acknowledged as the world s greatest war photographer before his tragic death in Vietnam Curtiz not only gives us Casablanca, consistently voted the greatest romantic movie ever made, but also discovers Doris Day and directs James Cagney in the quintessential patriotic film, Yankee Doodle Dandy Ultimately, The Great Escape is an American story and an important, previously untold chapter of the tumultuous last century Yet it is also a poignant story in the words of the great historian Fritz Stern, an evocation of genius in exile an instructive, moving delight An epilogue relates the journey into exile of three members of the next generation of Budapest exiles financier philanthropist George Soros, Intel founder Andy Grove, and 2002 Nobel laureate in literature Imre Kertesz.
    The Great Escape Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World In this ground breaking book acclaimed author Kati Marton brings to life an unknown chapter of World War II the tale of nine men who grew up in Budapest s brief Golden Age then driven from Hungary

    One thought on “The Great Escape: Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World”

    1. What fascinated me most about this book was how many famous Americans are really Hungarians I didn t know anything about Hungary before reading this, but I am driven to learn about the recent past because of this book The movie Casablanca was directed by a Hungarian, and the story of its creation is entrancing The idea of a US atom bomb was launched and created by three Hungarians Who knew that Hungarians have been so influential in 20th century Western life Hungarians are the only peopl ein Eu [...]

    2. Just finished Enemies of the People not dreaming that this could be as good, if not better But it is Marton is a terrific writer.

    3. I loved the history in this book It brought together the movie industry, the Manhattan Project and photography There were so many famous names that influenced America A most impressive work Read this book as well as The Invisible Bridge

    4. Kati Marton s The Great Escape is an eye opener How many of us know that turn of the century Budapest was a world unique hotbed of intellectual and artistic activity where Jews participated on an equal basis with gentiles Not me Nor did I know that when it all fell apart during and after WWI, when Hungary lost its seaport in the Versailles Trianon carveup, when poverty and despotism took over so much of Eastern Europe, these same prosperous Jews became worse and worse off as the century progress [...]

    5. After I finished Marton s Paris A Love Story I wasn t sure I d want to read anything else by her I d liked her book on Wallenberg well enough, but found some parts a bit ponderous It felt like she had a mission, which she completed than adequately, but her prose didn t fully resonate After those 2 books I wondered, quite frankly, how she d earned her stellar reputation as a writer, and suspected that perhaps she d benefited from the company she kept rather than her actual abilities Since the su [...]

    6. At end of summer in my last trip to Alaska, one of the parishioners in Petersburg lent me The Great Escape This was not the World War ii escape from a German prison camp but the escape from Hitler The subtitle was The Great Escape, Nine Jews who Fled Hitler and Changed the World It was written by an expatriate Hungarian The 9 Hungarians mentioned are an incredible group Robert Capa, Andre Kertesz, John von Neumann, Leo Szilard, Edward Teller, Eugene Wigner Wigner, Szilard to Einstein to start th [...]

    7. Marton s book, The Great Escape, follows the lives of nine exceptional Hungarians who lived during Hitler s reign of terror All nine escaped their homeland, and throughout the book, Marton follows the various paths their lives took She writes about Michael Curtiz, the man who brought the world the film Casablanca, and another director, Alexander Korda, known for his lavish sets and stunning films She also follows two photographers, Andre Kertesz who pioneered photojournalism, and Robert Capa, th [...]

    8. Interesting to be reading about Hungary as the Syrian refugee crisis seemed to highlight its current xenophobia.A mindset so far from the Golden Age of 1870 1910, experienced so soon after Hungary s war for independence was cruelly extinguishes in 1848 In 1867 Hungary s capital Budapest would become co capital of the Austro Hungarian Habsburg empire.A generation later, Hungary would experience a period of great advances in the arts sciences Its Golden Age, 1870 1910, presented the world so much [...]

    9. Fabulous read Inspiring and telling The story reveals the personal side of some great, historic accomplishments from the dismal and horrific time of Hitler These 9 Jews changed the world as we know it they pioneered advancements in science, photography, and literature Sometimes it was hard to keep track of the facts as most of the men changed their given names to escape Hitler and assimilate into Europe or America The scientists associated with Einstein pioneered the nuclear age and then, when r [...]

    10. This is a must read book for anyone with any interest in 20thC European history The author widow of Peter Jennings came to the US from Hungary with her family in the mid 50 s at the time of the Hungarian Revolution against the USSR She writes of the linguistic and cultural uniqueness of Hungarians in Europe making the point that the transition of Hungarians to the US was huge, given that they never really fit in well in their home continent The impact of WWI and the rapid and extreme political c [...]

    11. Fascinating read The only complaint I have is that while listening to it in the car which means I sometimes had to pull my attention away from the book to concentrate solely on something happening on the road , I began to get confused about who was doing what Especially since so many of the nine have names that begin with the same sound Took until the middle of the book to get that part down Other complaint has to do with the audiobook format I wish the reader would have paused for a moment when [...]

    12. Alexander Korda, Michael Curtiz, Arthur Koestler, Robert Capa, Andre Kertesz, Leo Szilard, Edward Teller, Eugene Wigner and John von Neumann To be honest I know next to nothing about Hungarian history, but I found this group of men fascinating Each one was driven and brilliant, but important for this story, and for the events of World War II, they were politically sophisticated and very pessimistic about the fate of Jews in Europe As a group they were not so much forced out of Europe as they wer [...]

    13. This was an interesting account of nine Hungarians who left Hungary just as Hitler came into power The book primarily focuses on their contributions to the world after leaving their homeland While the book was interesting, the description of the men s lives seemed inadequate since the author was trying to give a full biography for nine different men For example, on several occasions she describes in detail pictures taken by one man who revolutionized the photojournalist industry, but none of the [...]

    14. Marton s recounting of the experiences and influential lives of these nine men was excellent She painted a picture of each man s contributions individually and as a remarkable group This can t help but lead to thoughts of the unbelievable atrocities of Nazi Europe and the other unbelievable thinkers and artists that were lost.

    15. Unabridged and Narrated by Anna FieldsFrom Publishers WeeklyStarred Review Noted journalist and bestselling author Marton Hidden Power offers a haunting tale of the wartime Hungarian diaspora The nine illustrious Hungarians she profiles were all double outsiders, for, as well as being natives of a small, linguistically impenetrable, landlocked country, they were all Jews Fleeing fascism and anti Semitism for the New World, each experienced insecurity, isolation and a sense of perpetual exile Yet [...]

    16. initial reaction and informal commentaryThis is the true story of nine Jewish Hungarian men who escape from the Nazi s and immigrate to the United States and England Marton sets the stage of Budapest early in the 20th century It was said to be the Paris of Eastern Europe It was a Mecca for creative thought and the cafe society was thriving It served to be an inspiration for these nine men Author Arthur Koestler, phographers, Robert Capa and Andre Kertesz, filmakers Alexander Korda and Michael Cu [...]

    17. Fascinating book about Budapest and it s cultural history between WWI and WWII and some of the great minds who were nurtured there during this time but were forced to flee in order to fulfill their promise From the brilliant scientists and mathematicians Teller, von Neumann, Szilard and Wigner to the extraordinarily talented artistic ones Capa, Curtiz, Korda, Koestler and Kertesz, Budapest was the starting place for these secular Jews who, because of religious and political persecution chose to [...]

    18. This is quite a remarkable read The author is Kati Marton, who is herself originally an Hungarian Jew whose family fled after the uprising of 1956 against the Soviets She writes of certain earlier people who similarly fled Hungary but due to the Nazi regime She specifically focuses upon a select group of 9 which consists of photographers, film makers, a writer and scientists and this is an amazing group indeed who left an incredible mark upon the land to which they ultimately fled and global imp [...]

    19. In this ground breaking book, acclaimed author Kati Marton brings to life an unknown chapter of World War II the tale of nine men who grew up in Budapest s brief Golden Age, then, driven from Hungary by anti Semitism, fled to the West, especially to the United States, and changed the world These nine men, each celebrated for individual achievements, were actually part of a unique group who grew up in a time and place that will never come again It is Marton s extraordinary achievement to trace wh [...]

    20. I wanted to read this book because I appreciated Enemies of the People and Paris A Love Story both by Kati Marton.The Nine Jews of the title included photographers, movie directors, physicists and a writer They all grew up in the early years of the 20th century in Budapest and eventually fled to America and Paris and London It was a bit disconcerting to go from one great man s story to another as Marton followed a chronology I needed to write down the names and the occupations at one point As a [...]

    21. This is a very nice book It surveys the lives of nine Hungarians who fled their homeland and influenced the course of the 20th Century For those of us who have lived in Budapest it has special meaning but for others it is still valuable to recognize that oppression does not equal defeat I found it curious that among the many comments and quotes about the Hungarians who were key to the success of the Manhattan Project the most interesting attributed to Enrico Fermi was omitted When a student aske [...]

    22. This was a real difficult read to get into I was expecting to read about the life altering journeys of these nine men as they escaped the hands of the Hitler regime, but it just never really happened It spent most of the time talking about the Hungarian lifestyle, the entertainment business such as film and production as well as photography and also a lot about famous people such as Einstein and movie actors long since dead Although this in itself might have been an interesting read to many, I w [...]

    23. I learned about the rise and fall of Budapest as a great pre war city, an in depth look at Nazi persecution of Jews, and fascinating stories of nine great mean and others Kati Marton is simply put, an excellent writer, who by the way, writes this and her other works in English, not her native tongue, Hungarian She guides the reader through chronologically, but switches protagonists often enough to keep the reader on edge A classic example of historical truth reading like fiction A great read.

    24. A must.Marton conveys the sense of displacement and loss for 8 fascinating personalitiesHungarian Jews caught in eventful times that force them into exile where they are enormously successful in their chosen work but still never comfortable in the changing tide of the 20th centurya must read for the 20th historican.The book is dense and packed with information that fill in the blanks about stories that are part of 20th century topics It is also very entertaining full of the irony that makes life [...]

    25. I read this as an audiobook, and I wonder if I would have enjoyed it in a traditional reading format I frequently listen to audiobooks during my commute, and I usually find them to be an adequate format to experience a book Sometimes listening to a book rather than reading it actually enriches the experience However, it was difficult to keep the story lines straight this time, and I am guessing that I would not have had quite the same problem if I could have flipped back and forth in the book w [...]

    26. Great book Great book.This book was not at all what I expected I expected this book to be a bunch of crazy escape stories, but it was not It was like a condensed biography of 9 Hungarians, most of which were definitely not practicing Jews This covers 4 scientists who helped developed the A bomb, 2 directors, 2 photographers, and an author All of these men were world travelers who helped shaped world thinking and even world history.

    27. I don t usually read nonfiction, but this book was pretty interesting It s about nine men from Budapest who grew up there in the 20s and 30s It chronicles their lives, from youth and adolescence through adulthood It s an interesting perspective on the Jewish flight from Europe I was amazed at how much these men did that I knew about from work on the atomic bomb to movies they directed I thought it would get dry and boring by the end, but it didn t.

    28. I found this book hard to follow since the author chose to write a little bit about each of the nine men at a time to keep their stories all going concurrently Nine men, nine, nearly all of whom changed their Hungarian names at least once I was very confused until we finally got to about 1940 and they all stopped country hopping and kept the same name and focused on beating the Nazis.Still I did learn lots about Central Europe and Anti Semitism in 20th century Europe.

    29. fascinating book of Hungarian Jews who escaped Nazi Hungary Several of them were involved in the Manhattan project to develop the atomic bomb Some of them became famous in USA as film director Casablanca etc.This is also a good book to testify what a wonderful country USA is where people from other countries are able to succeed A MUST READ.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *